Displaying items by tag: Paramount Home Entertainment

We’ve got three new disc reviews for you to enjoy today, including...

Tim’s take on Halloween II (1981) and Halloween III (1982) on Blu-ray from Via Vision Entertainment, as well as Hanna-Barbera’s animated Rockin’ with Judy Jetson (1988) on Blu-ray from the Warner Archive Collection.

Watch for more reviews coming over the next few days.

In announcement news today, we have a few things to report. First, Warner Bros. Discovery Home Entertainment has made Jan de Bont’s Twister (1996) official for 4K Ultra HD and 4K UHD Steelbook release on 7/9. As we’ve reported previously, look for Dolby Atmos audio, HDR10 high dynamic range, the new The Legacy of Twister: Taken by the Wind retrospective featurette with the director, and the legacy Blu-ray and DVD extras. You can see the cover artwork at left and also below.

Warner Bros. has also set Luca Guadagnino’s Challengers (2024) for Blu-ray and DVD release on 7/9, for Amazon MGM Studios. There’s no indication of special features on the release.

But we’re not yet done with Warner & MGM. Though they haven’t officially been announced yet, the studios have also just listed John G. Avildsen’s Rocky V (1990) and Sylvester Stallone’s Rocky Balboa (2006) for 4K Ultra HD Steelbook release on 7/16. The latter will include both the original Theatrical Version and Stallone’s new Director’s Cut. Both will offer HDR10 high dynamic range and DTS-HD Master Audio. Also listed for release that same day is a brand new Rocky: Ultimate Knockout Collection in 4K, which we expect will include Rocky, Rocky II, Rocky III, Rocky IV, Rocky V, and Rocky Balboa. [Read on here...]

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We’ve got no less than eight new reviews for you guys to start the new week out right here at The Bits, staring with Tim’s look at The Good, The Bad, and Huckleberry Hound (1988) from Hanna-Barbera on Blu-ray from the Warner Archive Collection.

Dennis has offered his thoughts on Charles Brabin’s The Mask of Fu Manchu (1932) on Blu-ray also from the Warner Archive Collection, as well as Nancy Savoca’s True Love (1989) on Blu-ray from Kino Lorber Studio Classics.

Stuart has delivered four reviews, including Ulrich Seidl’s Rimini (2022) on Blu-ray from Vinegar Syndrome, Jean-Paul Salomé’s La Syndicaliste (2022) on Blu-ray from Kino Lorber, John Boorman’s The Emerald Forest (1985) on Blu-ray from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, and Robert Allan Ackerman’s Life with Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows (2001) on DVD from Via Vision Entertainment.

And finally, Stephen has got an in-depth review of Alex Proyas’ The Crow (1994) in 4K Ultra HD from Paramount Home Entertainment, which is a gorgeous restoration that should impress most cinephiles.

All of these films are well worth a look, and more new disc reviews are certainly on the way this week, so be sure to watch for them.

Now then, my apologies for the lack of a news update here since mid last week, but I have unfortunately had COVID. Fortunately, a mild case, but enough to knock me out of commission for a few days. But I’m well on the path to recovery and feeling well enough to catch you all up on the latest news here at The Bits today. So let’s get right to it... [Read on here...]

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Today’s update is a quick one, but we’re starting with more new disc reviews...

Tim has posted his thoughts on Guillermo del Toro’s Crimson Peak (2015) in 4K Ultra HD from Arrow Video, as well as Hanna-Barbera’s Top Cat and the Beverly Hills Cats (1988) on Blu-ray from the Warner Archive Collection.

And Dennis has reviewed Francis Ford Coppola’s The Rain People (1969) on Blu-ray, also from the Warner Archive Collection.

In announcement news today, Warner Bros. Discovery Home Entertainment has just made Albert Magnoli’s Purple Rain (1984) official for release in physical 4K Ultra HD and 4K Digital on 6/25 (SRP $33.99 for the disc). As expected, the disc will include audio commentary by Magnoli, Robert Cavallo, and Donald E. Thorin, 3 featurettes (First Avenue: The Road to Pop Royalty, Purple Rain Backstage Pass: Behind the Scenes, and Riffs, Ruffles and a Revolution: The Impact and Influence of Purple Rain), the MTV Premiere Party Original Broadcast, a gallery of Prince movie trailers, and 8 music videos for songs from the film. [Read on here...]

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We’re starting this week off with a pair of major new disc reviews here at The Bits...

Stephen has taken a deep dive into Jonathan Demme’s legendary concert film, Stop Making Sense (1984), newly-restored in 4K Ultra HD and available exclusively from the A24 online shop. This is arguably the greatest concert film ever produced, featuring the music of Talking Heads and the cinematography of Jordan Cronenweth (he shot this right after completing work on Blade Runner and Buckaroo Banzai).

I’ve also finished my in-depth review of Denis Villeneuve’s magnificent Dune: Part Two (2024) in 4K Ultra HD from Warner Bros. Discovery Home Entertainment. It’s an epic pure-cinema masterpiece and, along with Dune: Part One, rightly takes its place alongside Stanley Kubrick’s 2001 and Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner as one of the greatest science fiction films of all time. And while one could pick a few nits with Warner’s 4K release, the A/V quality is demo-worthy.

Both films are absolutely not to be missed on disc, so be sure to give the reviews a look. And more reviews are on the way this week, so be sure to watch for those.

In release news today, the big item worth mentioning is that Paramount has just set Alexander Payne’s Election (1999) for release on 4K Ultra HD on 7/30 as a new Paramount Presents title. You can see the cover artwork at left. [Read on here...]

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Good afternoon, folks! We’re starting the week off with four new disc reviews...

Stuart has given Via Vision’s On the Buses Film Collection box set a review, which includes On the Buses (1971), Mutiny on the Buses (1972), and Holiday on the Buses (1973) all on Blu-ray. These of course are based on the popular British TV sitcom from the late 1960s and early 70s.

Dennis has taken a look at Raoul Walsh’s They Drive by Night (1940) on Blu-ray from the Warner Archive Collection.

Stephen has offered his thoughts on Andrei Tarkovsky’s Nostalghia (1983) in 4K Ultra HD from Kino Lorber Studio Classics.

And finally, I’ve completed an in-depth review of one of my favorite films: Sergio Leone’s magnificent Western epic Once Upon a Time in the West (1968) in 4K Ultra HD from Paramount via their Paramount Presents line. And I’m afraid the disc is... complicated.

In any case, more new disc reviews are on the way this week, so be sure to keep your eyes peeled for them! [Read on here...]

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We have a new disc review for all of you to enjoy today here at The Bits...

Our own Tim Salmons has just weighed in on the Warner Archive Collection’s Looney Tunes: Collector’s Choice – Volume 1 Blu-ray, which includes 20 classic animated shorts from 1945 to 1959, among them some real rarities. Tim will be reviewing Volume 2 and Volume 3 on Blu-ray soon as well, so watch for those to follow in the coming days.

We’ve also updated our 4K Ultra HD Release List here at The Bits today with some new titles and Amazon.com pre-order links, so you’ll definitely want to check that out here.

And over on our Patreon page today, I’ve shared a feature entitled Steelbooks (And Why Hollywood Loves Them)! that looks back at the origins and history of Steelbook packaging, and why it’s become so popular with both the Hollywood studios and retailers. This post is free and open to everyone for a couple of reasons.

First, we want to give you all a taste of the kinds of content we’re creating exclusively for our paying supporters on Patreon. And second, we’re going to be running a poll on our Patreon page on behalf of a major Hollywood studio that wants your opinion on a Steelbook project they’re considering. That will appear in the next couple days there and it too will be free and available to all. [Read on here...]

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Welcome to a new week, Bits-ers! Hope you all had a good one, including all those of you who attended WonderCon in Anaheim this weekend.

Today is obviously April Fool’s Day, but rest assured we aren’t going to waste time with such tomfoolery here at the site this afternoon because we’ve got more new disc reviews for you, as well as some really great actual news too.

Let’s get to those reviews first. Today we have...

Stephen’s review of Ted Kotcheff’s North Dallas Forty (1979) in 4K Ultra HD from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, as well as his take on György Kovásznai’s Bubble Bath (1980) on Blu-ray from Vinegar Syndrome.

And Stuart’s look at William Grefé’s Impulse (1974) on Blu-ray from Grindhouse Releasing, as well as Emmanuel Carrère’s Between Two Worlds (2021) on Blu-ray from Cohen Media Group.

Late last week, we also posted Tim’s reviews of Sam Raimi’s Drag Me to Hell (2009) in both regular and limited edition Blu-ray, as well as his reviews of Quentin Tarantino (etc)’s Grindhouse (2007) in both regular and limited edition Blu-ray, all from Via Vision’s Imprint Films.

And not to be outdone, Dennis has also reviewed Peter Yates’ The Dresser (1983) on Blu-ray from Imprint as well. [Read on here...]

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All right, welcome to a new week Bits readers!

Today is all about James Cameron here at the website, and to that end I’ve just finished knocking out in-depth reviews of the filmmaker’s The Abyss (1989), Aliens (1986), and True Lies (1994) in long-awaited physical 4K Ultra HD and remastered Blu-ray from 20th Century Studios!

The gist is that all three of these discs are worth picking up for Cameron fans and cinephiles, though one of the three titles is a bit complicated. The Abyss is the best looking of the three, nearly on par with the recent Titanic 4K release. Aliens is not far behind in terms of A/V quality and both titles include a nearly complete archive of all past special features created for the films.

True Lies is... well, it looks a lot better than the previous DVD, LaserDisc, and D-VHS releases. Sometimes, it looks fantastic. But at other times, the remastering is a little bit heavy-handed.

It’s still way better looking than StudioCanal’s Terminator 2 4K release though, so it’s a very solid upgrade over previous physical media releases, and it includes some nice features too.

Anyway, you’ll find all of the details in the linked reviews.

But while we’re on the topic of Cameron—and speaking the Terminatorproducer Gale Anne Hurd shared over the weekend that plans to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Cameron’s original The Terminator (1984) are soon to be revealed. And we have good word that a new 4K Ultra HD release will chief among them. In the meantime, you can see her post on X/Twitter here. [Read on here...]

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We’ve got four more new disc reviews for you today, including...

Stuart’s take on Douglas Sirk’s Has Anybody Seen My Gal (1952) on Blu-ray from Kino Lorber Studio Classics.

Dennis’ look at Harry Beaumont’s Faithless (1932) on Blu-ray from the Warner Archive Collection, as well as Giuseppe Fiorello’s Fireworks (2023) on DVD from Cinephobia Releasing.

And Stephen’s review of Ishirō Honda’s Invasion of Astro-Monster (1965) in 4K Ultra HD from Toho Studios in Japan (note that this release has no English subtitles).

Also this afternoon, we’ve asked our supporters on The Bits’ new Patreon page to share their Ten Favorite TV Series, and we’ve updated our 4K Ultra HD Release List here at The Bits with new titles as well.

In announcement news today, Kino Lorber Studio Classics has just officially set Fred Zinnemann’s High Noon (1942) for release on Blu-ray and 4K Ultra HD on 4/16. The film will include a collection of legacy special features (from previous Blu-ray and DVD releases) along with a pair of new audio commentary track by film historians, one by Alan K. Rode and another by Julie Kirgo. You can see the cover artwork above left and also below. Look for Dolby Vision HDR on the 4K disc. [Read on here...]

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Today’s post starts with three new disc reviews, including...

Stuart’s take on the Film Focus: George Peppard box set from Imprint, which includes John Guillermin’s P.J. (1968), George Schaefer’s Pendulum (1969), Sam Wanamaker’s The Executioner (1970), and Richard T. Heffron’s Newman’s Law (1974).

Dennis’ look at Val Guest’s Assignment K (1968), also new on Blu-ray from Imprint.

And finally, Stephen’s thoughts on Vincente Minnelli and Busby Berkeley’s Cabin in the Sky (1943) on Blu-ray from the Warner Archive Collection.

Note that we have lots more new disc reviews on the way, so be sure to watch for them. Also here at The Bits today, we’ve posted a significant update of our 4K Ultra HD Release List with lots of new 4K UHD titles and Amazon links.

And for our Patreon supporters, we’ve recently shared our thoughts on Ron Moore’s Battlestar Galactica and how well the series holds up some fifteen years after it ended its run on the Sci-Fi Channel, along with some preliminary commentary on changes that are brewing within the home entertainment industry, as well as Stephen’s thoughts on the ethics of film alteration and the challenges in determining how films should look on Blu-ray and especially 4K. Supporting The Bits on Patreon is a great way to help us continue our work in service of physical media, and we surely do appreciate it. [Read on here...]

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